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JUNE 2022 NEWSLETTER: SENIOR HEALTHCARE ADVISORS



In this Edition:

  • Seniors and cold weather

  • Are you sitting correctly

  • The Dangers of Falling


Going outside when it’s cold, or being in a very cold home, can lead to hypothermia. Do your best to pay attention to how cold the temperature is wherever you are. Try to avoid being in a cold place for very long. The next sections are some helpful hints to lower your risk of getting hypothermia.

Keep Warm Inside

Living in a cold apartment, house, or other type of building can cause hypothermia. For those in assisted living facilities or nursing homes, sometimes the rooms are too cold. If you know someone living in a group environment, pay close attention to what the inside temperature is and whether your loved one is dressed warmly enough.

Seniors with illnesses may be specially inclined to have problems keeping warm. You don’t have to wait until it is too cold in your home to dress warmly. Even if you keep your home at or around 65°F, it may not be warm enough to stay safe. If you are living alone, this is a special issue, because no one is there, but you, to notice the cold, or notice if you are showing symptoms of hypothermia.

Tips for Staying Warm Indoors

  • Keep your heat on at least 70°F. You can save money on your heating bill by closing off any rooms not in use. Shut the doors and close the vents in these rooms, and keep the basement door closed. Roll up towels, and put it at the feet of all doors to keep the drafts out.

  • Check to make sure your home is not letting the heat escape through windows. Keep your curtains and blinds closed. If you notice gaps around your windows, caulk or apply weather strips to prevent cold air from coming in.

  • On cold days, dress warmly even if you are staying home. Keep a throw blanket handy to drape over your legs. Wear slippers and socks.

  • At nighttime, pull out your long underwear to have on under your pjs, and keep extra blankets on the bed. You can also wear a nightcap. Make sure you are keeping your weight up by eating enough food. If you are not eating right, you won’t have the protection of fat under your skin to keep you warm.

  • Watch your alcohol intake, or don’t even drink any during the winter. Beverages containing alcohol makes your body lose heat.

  • Have your family members or friends do welfare checks on you during cold weather if you live alone. Don’t try to stay home during a power outage. Try to stay with a friend or relative.

Seniors and the Dangers of Falling


Every year, millions of people over the age of 65 fall, and many often don't tell their doctors which is unfortunate because studies say if you fall one time, your chance





Many times these falls are preventable. Older adults must practice FALL PREVENTION!

The risks associated with falling often make it very difficult for a person to accomplish their activities of daily living (ADLs) or to get around or live alone. Many older adults take blood thinners, making falling even more dangerous and possibly leading to internal bleeding or death. A doctor should be seen immediately, even if you think the person did not get hurt. They may have a head injury or internal bleeding. Many older adults don't like to talk about fall risks in fear of being a burden or refusal to accept the limitations of aging.

Some individuals become so afraid of falling that they decrease their activity levels, leading them to become weaker, increasing their risk of falling even more. But don't let your fear of falling stop you from being active. You can overcome this fear by becoming informed. Get together with a family member or a buddy when gardening, walking, shopping, or other social activities. Facing and overcoming the fear of falling can keep you healthier.


Are you Sitting Correctly?


Learning how to sit correctly is important for maintaining a healthy spine and back and a good posture. Sitting straight is good for your physical health. It also aids in building your self-confidence. We spend a lot of time sitting; we travel in a sitting position, many work sitting at a desk, and we tend to dine, relax, and enjoy entertainment, all while sitting.


The Importance of Sitting Posture

Sitting posture is usually the result of habits formed over your lifetime. We often notice other people’s poor posture without realizing that our own sitting posture needs improvement. Sitting hunched over is very noticeable! Sitting correctly involves practice and training yourself to deal with gravity with the least amount of tension and strain on the body parts that support you. Keeping your joints and bones aligned keeps them in optimal health and reduces the wear and tear that accompanies aging. Sitting with your joints and bones aligned improves circulation, helps to keep your blood vessels and nervous system healthy and lowers the chances of chronic back and neck pain.



Sitting aligned can lower muscle strain and fatigue and help to keep your joints lubricated and healthy. Improper sitting positions can lead to back and neck pain, headaches, constipation, and poor digestion (acid reflux). It is also a significant factor in developing osteoarthritis.

Sitting in a slouched position for extended periods stresses your lower back. It puts pressure on your spine, including the muscles, intervertebral discs, and ligaments.

Sitting correctly involves practice and training yourself to deal with gravity with the least amount of tension and strain on the body parts that support you. Keeping your joints and bones aligned keeps them in optimal health and reduces the wear and tear that accompanies aging. Sitting with your joints and bones aligned improves circulation, helps to keep your blood vessels and nervous system healthy and lowers the chances of chronic back and neck pain.