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The End to Your Suffering With Cataracts

Cataracts enormously impact the quality of your life and your activities of daily living. Truthfully, cataracts can make your life frustrating. It can become difficult to enjoy doing the things you love while your eyesight gradually declines.

It is a challenging reality to feel unsure of your eyesight and, therefore, yourself. Until you decide to have cataract surgery, you will need to learn to cope with the symptoms. Cataract surgery is not usually prescribed until your vision has become impaired by them. Your ophthalmologist will let you know when to have the surgery to remove your cataracts.

Cataracts are a slow progressive clouding of the eye’s natural lenses. Regular eye exams can help identify cataracts early on and provide you with treatment options. Without treatment, blindness can occur.

Cataract Symptoms

  • Blurry vision

  • Dulling of colors

  • “Halos” surrounding lights

  • Sunlight sensitivity

  • Worsening nearsightedness.

Here are some helpful tips on how to cope with cataracts.

Avoid Nighttime Driving


Driving at nighttime with cataracts can be a living nightmare. Oncoming car headlights, street light halos, and glare make driving dangerous at night. Blurry vision can make it difficult to read street signs and the ability to make out pedestrians. If you are experiencing difficulty with night driving, it may be time to have your cataracts removed.

Change Up Your Diet


While cataracts can happen to anyone, some research studies have strongly indicated that your diet affects how the disease progresses. Eating foods rich in vitamins, antioxidants, minerals, and fats can slow down the growth of cataracts, slow the deterioration of your vision and postpone your need for cataracts surgery.

Here are a few good foods to add to your diet:


  • Tuna and Salmon are rich in omega-3 fatty acids which promote good eye health.

  • Eggs and Almonds contain Vitamin B (riboflavin) which is a preventative measure against the development of cataracts.

  • Dark leafy greens like kale and spinach are “superfoods” and contain zeaxanthin (a potent antioxidant) and lutein which is extremely beneficial for healthy eyes.

  • Raw red bell peppers, bok choy, papaya, cauliflower, and strawberries are loaded with vitamins A, E, and C, which are beneficial for the blood vessels in your eyes. Research studies have found that raw red bell peppers can help prevent the risk of getting cataracts.

  • Nuts and sunflower seeds are full of vitamin E which can slow the progression of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)


Talk With Your Doctor

If you are already suffering from the symptoms of cataracts, you must go to your eye doctor for regular check-ups. Regular visits allow you and your doctor to monitor and track the condition's progression. Make a list of all your questions about your condition and cataract surgery. The more informed you are about cataracts, the less anxiety you will experience.

Touch Base With Your Family and Friends


Even if you are a tough cookie, living with cataracts can be a stressful and frustrating experience. Talking about it with your family and close friends is good for your mental health.

As you approach your cataract surgery, you may need to reach out for transportation and some help with chores while you are recovering.

Do your Homework

Gathering information from various trusted sources can make your experience healthier. Knowing what to expect before, during, and after the surgery will cut down on any anxieties or confusion you may feel during the process.


Doing a bit of research can help you put together a list of questions for your cataract surgeon and allow you to read reviews and comments from people who have already gone through the surgery.

Before Cataract Surgery


Your ophthalmologist (eye surgeon) will measure the size and shape of your eye and cornea so the doctor can determine the correct focusing power of your new lens.

Your surgeon will want you to list all your current medications, including over-the-counter medicines, and will most likely prescribe an antibiotic and steroid eye drops before and after the surgery to prevent swelling and infection. You may also need to stop certain medications before surgery, such as any medications containing aspirin or medicines for prostate problems. Your surgeon may also instruct you to have no food or fluids after midnight or 12 hours before your surgery.

Usually, patients go home on the same day as the surgery. But, you cannot drive! Make sure you have someone to help you or arrange for transportation. It would help if you did not lift or bend over for at least seven days post-surgery.

Cataract Surgery (Phacoemulsification or Extracapsular)


Your doctor will first dilate your pupil with eye drops. You may also be given a sedative and a local anesthetic to numb the eye area.

Phacoemulsification cataract surgery involves removing the lens of your eye and replacing it with an artificial one. The eye surgeon makes a small incision and breaks up the cataract with sound-pulse waves into smaller pieces and then removes them with a tiny vacuum, after which, he places the new lens in. The incision is so tiny that stitches are rarely needed.

Another type of cataract surgery is called Extracapsular, which involves a slightly larger incision to remove the lens in one piece. This type of surgery is called for when the cataract is very cloudy making it more difficult to break up with sound-pulse waves (phacoemulsification).

Replacement lenses vary. Many individuals need distance lenses for both eyes, and then use reading glass for up-close vision. These types of monofocal lenses are commonly covered by most insurance companies. There are several other types of replacement lenses, so talk to your doctor about which is the best option to suit your needs.

After Cataract Surgery


Your doctor will first dilate your pupil with eye drops. You may also be given a sedative and a local anesthetic to numb the eye area.

Phacoemulsification cataract surgery involves removing the lens of your eye and replacing it with an artificial one. The eye surgeon makes a small incision, breaks up the cataract with sound-pulse waves into smaller pieces, and then removes them with a tiny vacuum, after which he places the new lens. The incision is so tiny that stitches are rarely needed.

Another type of cataract surgery is Extracapsular, which involves a slightly larger incision to remove the lens in one piece. This type of surgery is called for when the cataract is very cloudy, making it more challenging to break up with sound-pulse waves (phacoemulsification).

Replacement lenses vary. Many individuals need distance lenses for both eyes and reading glasses for up-close vision. There are several other types of replacement lenses, so talk to your doctor about the best option to suit your needs.

Contact your doctor right away if you experience any of the following:


  • Trouble with or loss of vision

  • Persistent pain, even when using prescribed or OTC medications

  • Increased swelling of the eyelid

  • Increase redness of the eye

  • Spots, floaters, or light flashing in front of your eye


The bottom line is that most cataract surgeries successfully restore vision! Occasionally, a secondary cataract called posterior capsule opacification (PCO) can occur. PCO happens when the remaining part of the lens becomes cloudy. It is easily treated with a quick and painless outpatient procedure that lasts about five minutes. A laser surgery known as YAG (yttrium-aluminum-garnet) clears a path in the clouded lens for light to pass through.

Hopefully, this article has answered most of the fundamental questions about coping with cataracts! Remember, this is a widespread condition that is usually treated successfully! Consult your insurance company before you get treatment to know what your benefits include.



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